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Sara Camporesi
Sara Camporesi

April 16 : 2024

Sara Camporesi

Sara's image has successfully evoked both contemporary living and an old-fashioned sensibility, which is a huge accomplishment in the world of photography.

by Lily Fierman

"FOTOAUTOMATICA"

Q:

Tell us more about the making of your winning image, “FOTOAUTOMATICA.”

A:

As a photographer passionate about art, for a long time I have combined this interest with the spontaneity of visual storytelling, conceived not only as a classic account of experiences but as a blend of personal and creative shots.

The winning photo represents an intense and life-changing period in 2020 when I moved to Florence for a few months to earn a IED Master degree in arts management, educational programs and digital communication for cultural institutions.

Every day wandering through the alleys of the city to take pictures was like finding my ‘centre of gravity’ again after some difficult years.

Photography can always be therapeutic and in this case also generous with shots to get fond of.

I prefer waiting for the right moment, so that the crowd does not disturb my scene: cities are an open-air museum where the urban fabric is revealed little by little to our eyes, in a slow experience, at a walking pace, paying attention to architecture, lines, patterns, and geometry.

Q:

In your bio, you mention that part of your role is as a ‘photographic narrator.’ How does this affect your decision about what you choose to photograph?

A:

In my opinion, making up a photograph does not only mean stopping, observing, choosing what to frame and shooting.

Instead, it means that each subject of the shot is like an actor in a film whose director is creativity: so that, even after some time, old photographs evoke memories and bring with them emotions: joy, happiness, sighs, sadness.

Photography is never a precise copy of reality but refers to other interpretations and personal perceptions mixed with memory.

Q:

Street photography is defined by spontaneity. However, we know it involves lots of looking and seeking out subjects as a photographer. With that in mind, what makes you stop and consider photographing a subject?

A:

In street photography there are two diametrically opposed methods when we try to take photos: two different techniques colloquially referred to “hunting” and “fishing” approach.

There is no right photographic method, only the one that helps you succeed: running around to chase interesting subjects or finding the perfect setting and waiting for the right “fish” to swim by. I prefer waiting for the right moment, so that the crowd does not disturb my scene: cities are an open-air museum where the urban fabric is revealed little by little to our eyes, in a slow experience, at a walking pace, paying attention to architecture, lines, patterns, and geometry.

Q:

What is your dream subject?

A:

My images represent my idea of the ‘perfect snapshot’, focusing on a specific detail, shadow, a person or building. Composition is a very important part of this but also the alternation of strong light and shadows makes the photos interesting for me.

Post production helps to emphasise everything, my vision of things. The 'chiaroscuro' makes everything magical, dreamy, mysterious... as a painter's canvas begun and never finished, consecrated to eternity. It plays a fundamental role because it allows me to convey the sensations that I 'saw' before I took the shot: red like passion, yellow like sunny days and amber like aged things.

Therefore, my dream subject? The rooms of a huge museum, lit by the natural light of the setting sun.

Q:

What are you working on now?

A:

It would be a great achievement for me to see my images published in foreign magazines specialised in art: Paris, London, New York...

I’m a curious explorer, with the humbleness to learn from others and the stubbornness to pursue dreams.

Q:

What photographers would you love to have a chat with?

A:

The more I experience photography, the more I realize there cannot be just one “teacher” to be inspired by, to avoid the risk of being stuck in a single vision of things.

Of course, the Masters of Street and Urban Photography always lead the way: Henri Cartier Bresson, Robert Doisneau, Lee Friedlander, Vivian Maier, Gianni Berengo Gardin, Luigi Ghirri, Franco Fontana, Gabriele Basilico, Nino Migliori, Fulvio Roiter, Paolo Monti.

Q:

If you could own the work of one artist, regardless of any obstacles, what would it be?

A:

Honestly, I would love to have a self-portrait taken by Robert Doisneau with his friend Henri Cartier Bresson, smiling on a sunny Sunday, like the best friends to cherish.

ARTIST

Sara Camporesi

Sara Camporesi

Location:

Italy

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Black & White Photo Contest

Black & White Photo Contest

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Jun 26th - Jul 23rd

The Black & White Photo Contest by reFocus Awards welcomes both individual image and series submissions that honor and explore black and white photography.

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